This excerpt from Play to God is from the “About the Author” section.Click here to order Play to God

woman in red top blowing red bubble maker
Photo by Flickr on Pexels.com

I grew up playing in the back yards of two houses in Pomona, California. I had an amazing, hand-built playhouse that one of my carpenter grandpas made for me. I played house, dress-up, and wedding. I also rode a bike, but I was slow learning it, and I never learned to skate or skateboard. I was good at hop-scotch and an ace at jacks. I loved jump-rope, but never got the hang of double-dutch. My dad used to build us kites from scratch and flew them with us in the vacant lot up the street.

When I had to learn sports in school, my pudginess made me a loser at running games like softball and basketball, but I was good at volleyball because I could serve. Doubles tennis and badminton were also okay.

Not an athlete, I got joy from creating. I liked to write things to affect others. I wrote little plays in elementary school and marshaled friends to play the parts. In sixth grade, I wrote square dance steps to Beatles songs and called them on Friday during the class’s square dancing day. In junior high, I wrote love stories about the Beatles and whatever TV heartthrob I had a crush on. I bound them in report covers and circulated them among my friends.

In high school, academics started to edge out play. I loved my English classes, though, and whenever the teacher offered a creative option, I would take it. I wrote a haiku about a candy bar, a poem to Yosemite, and a fantasy about Henry David Thoreau going to a modern supermarket. I liked dancing and cheering at football games, from the stands of course.

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